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Recent Medias for hashtag : #outback.

Discover buffetbillywilly's Instagram Costela suína ao molho barbecue, batata recheada, anéis de cebola, arroz tasmania, massa e acompamentos... Para deixar com água na boca. 
#melhoreschefs #buffetbillywilly #billywilly #costela #barbecue #outback #momentooutback #reuniramigos #reunirafamilia #jantar #boanoite 1630804176324648228_398947834

Costela suína ao molho barbecue, batata recheada, anéis de cebola, arroz tasmania, massa e acompamentos... Para deixar com água na boca. #melhoreschefs #buffetbillywilly #billywilly #costela #barbecue #outback #momentooutback #reuniramigos #reunirafamilia #jantar #boanoite

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Discover jcwallaceofficial's Instagram Super happy today. Have a nice weekend. 
#guitar #stratocaster #telecaster #lespaul #faith #god #love #music #rock #beer #food #outback 1630803180529245054_445596561

Super happy today. Have a nice weekend. #guitar #stratocaster #telecaster #lespaul #faith #god #love #music #rock #beer #food #outback

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Discover agwomen's Instagram Agricultural journalist, Alice Dyer, from Kent, England, decided from a young age that farming was what she was going to do in life, and nothing could convince her otherwise. Growing up on a small dairy farm and without a huge amount of farming knowledge, after leaving school Alice spent the next five years studying agriculture, first at Hadlow College in Kent, and then a BSc Honors degree course at The Royal Agricultural University, Cirencester. It was during this time she started to blog her country lifestyle, working on livestock farms and game shoots in her spare time, and her love for writing grew.
After graduating from university she started to seek out opportunities to combine her knowledge of agriculture, and her talent for writing, and was offered a job as a reporter for South East Farmer magazine in her home county of Kent, where she undertook formal journalism training.
“The best thing about my job is being able to visit new farms everyday, seeing new systems and each farm’s unique methods of practice. Unlike many industries, farmers love to share their knowledge with others. It’s helped me see the bigger picture and I love promoting innovative, forward thinking farmers in the positive light they deserve.”
During her time at South East Farmer she also bred and showed her own flock of Southdown sheep, keeping busy and never letting her feet touch the ground. But after two years in her role, Alice's feet became itchy and she decided that it was now or never. She packed in her job, sold her sheep, and embarked on her next adventure, working on a sheep station near Gore, in the South Island of New Zealand. Here she learnt about the completely different methods adopted by New Zealand farmers and familiarised herself with the issues threatening their industry- some very different to anything she'd ever experienced, but many very similar to those she was familiar with at home.
For more of Alice's story, visit www.agwomenglobal.com/blog 1630802609098781936_3979521464

Agricultural journalist, Alice Dyer, from Kent, England, decided from a young age that farming was what she was going to do in life, and nothing could convince her otherwise. Growing up on a small dairy farm and without a huge amount of farming knowledge, after leaving school Alice spent the next five years studying agriculture, first at Hadlow College in Kent, and then a BSc Honors degree course at The Royal Agricultural University, Cirencester. It was during this time she started to blog her country lifestyle, working on livestock farms and game shoots in her spare time, and her love for writing grew. After graduating from university she started to seek out opportunities to combine her knowledge of agriculture, and her talent for writing, and was offered a job as a reporter for South East Farmer magazine in her home county of Kent, where she undertook formal journalism training. “The best thing about my job is being able to visit new farms everyday, seeing new systems and each farm’s unique methods of practice. Unlike many industries, farmers love to share their knowledge with others. It’s helped me see the bigger picture and I love promoting innovative, forward thinking farmers in the positive light they deserve.” During her time at South East Farmer she also bred and showed her own flock of Southdown sheep, keeping busy and never letting her feet touch the ground. But after two years in her role, Alice's feet became itchy and she decided that it was now or never. She packed in her job, sold her sheep, and embarked on her next adventure, working on a sheep station near Gore, in the South Island of New Zealand. Here she learnt about the completely different methods adopted by New Zealand farmers and familiarised herself with the issues threatening their industry- some very different to anything she'd ever experienced, but many very similar to those she was familiar with at home. For more of Alice's story, visit www.agwomenglobal.com/blog

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Discover agwomen's Instagram Born and raised on a farm in South East Ireland, @irishfarmerette  never saw herself becoming a farmer- that’s what her brother was supposed to do. Severe allergies curtailed Lorna’s farming at times, despite having her favourite cows and calves, and she went on to work in the UK as a secondary school teacher.
It was only when her younger brother decided not to farm, fifteen years ago, that the family farm was offered to Lorna and her husband Brian. Brian was working as a scientist but they had always shared a love for cows. They took the plunge and moved back to Ireland, their eldest child just three weeks old. 
Now with two children, aged 13 and 15, the couple have bought more land and milk 125 cows and rear all male calves for beef. Working a number of hours on the farm most days, Lorna has also turned her hand to writing with three books published and working on her fourth, winning a number of awards along the way. Would you marry a farmer? became a hit with the farming community, giving a realistic but humorous look at farming life. 
As one of the co-founders of the South East Women in Farming group which launched in January, Lorna is keen to connect women in agriculture. “We hold a meeting most months and focus on educating and empowering women, and yes, having some fun too. Twelve of us went over to Wales in July and while spending a day at the Royal Welsh Show, we also met up with many members of a Welsh Women in Farming group. They may be coming to visit us in Ireland soon.” As co-organiser of the curated Twitter account @IrelandsFarmers, whereby a different Irish farmer tweets each week, Lorna is keen to showcase Irish food production and methods of farming to their 12,000 followers. Lorna feels privileged to be an Ag Woman, championing the Irish farming community- particularly the female ones.
Lorna, you sound like a super busy AgWomen, managing not only farm life but all of your social and communication channels. You are a fabulous advocate for the rural sector as well as women in agriculture, keep up the amazing work. 1630802369855774462_3979521464

Born and raised on a farm in South East Ireland, @irishfarmerette never saw herself becoming a farmer- that’s what her brother was supposed to do. Severe allergies curtailed Lorna’s farming at times, despite having her favourite cows and calves, and she went on to work in the UK as a secondary school teacher. It was only when her younger brother decided not to farm, fifteen years ago, that the family farm was offered to Lorna and her husband Brian. Brian was working as a scientist but they had always shared a love for cows. They took the plunge and moved back to Ireland, their eldest child just three weeks old. Now with two children, aged 13 and 15, the couple have bought more land and milk 125 cows and rear all male calves for beef. Working a number of hours on the farm most days, Lorna has also turned her hand to writing with three books published and working on her fourth, winning a number of awards along the way. Would you marry a farmer? became a hit with the farming community, giving a realistic but humorous look at farming life. As one of the co-founders of the South East Women in Farming group which launched in January, Lorna is keen to connect women in agriculture. “We hold a meeting most months and focus on educating and empowering women, and yes, having some fun too. Twelve of us went over to Wales in July and while spending a day at the Royal Welsh Show, we also met up with many members of a Welsh Women in Farming group. They may be coming to visit us in Ireland soon.” As co-organiser of the curated Twitter account @IrelandsFarmers, whereby a different Irish farmer tweets each week, Lorna is keen to showcase Irish food production and methods of farming to their 12,000 followers. Lorna feels privileged to be an Ag Woman, championing the Irish farming community- particularly the female ones. Lorna, you sound like a super busy AgWomen, managing not only farm life but all of your social and communication channels. You are a fabulous advocate for the rural sector as well as women in agriculture, keep up the amazing work.

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Discover agwomen's Instagram After growing up on a dairy farm just out of Matamata, Krystal De Haas didn't expect to be share milking years later, on the other side of town with her own family. As a child growing up she loved the outdoors building hay huts, riding horses, possum shooting, eeling and later on helping cover maize stacks, relief milking and helping herd test for her own Mum and Dad but also neighbours. 
But being a female Krystal also loved fashion, gaining a placing at the Ag Art awards later in college before going on to complete a diploma in Fashion. She worked in the industry for a couple of years in Morrinsville, before changing tack and going on to complete a degree in Early Childhood Education. 
As well as having a passion for fashion and children since meeting her husband Krystal has also found herself enjoying being back on the farm. Something she has found to be nice, having the variety of teaching and farming. "I love that balance of farming and teaching, I find there is something about farming that is very soothing, and cows don't answer you back."
Krystal and her husband, Aaron, have been farming on her father in laws farm for over 8 years, and are now 50/50 share milking 390 cows on 110h. Krystal takes on the role of relief milker and helps out over calving, something that she has found a bit more challenging since the arrival of their son Saxon last year. The couple also have a 40h lease block across the road, where they grow maize and raise the young stock. This block is a lot hillier but with amazing views that over look Matamata, and now has an extra special hill side spot where Aaron proposed to Krystal. 
For more of Krystal's amazing story, visit www.agwomenglobl.com/blog 1630802099390163465_3979521464

After growing up on a dairy farm just out of Matamata, Krystal De Haas didn't expect to be share milking years later, on the other side of town with her own family. As a child growing up she loved the outdoors building hay huts, riding horses, possum shooting, eeling and later on helping cover maize stacks, relief milking and helping herd test for her own Mum and Dad but also neighbours. But being a female Krystal also loved fashion, gaining a placing at the Ag Art awards later in college before going on to complete a diploma in Fashion. She worked in the industry for a couple of years in Morrinsville, before changing tack and going on to complete a degree in Early Childhood Education. As well as having a passion for fashion and children since meeting her husband Krystal has also found herself enjoying being back on the farm. Something she has found to be nice, having the variety of teaching and farming. "I love that balance of farming and teaching, I find there is something about farming that is very soothing, and cows don't answer you back." Krystal and her husband, Aaron, have been farming on her father in laws farm for over 8 years, and are now 50/50 share milking 390 cows on 110h. Krystal takes on the role of relief milker and helps out over calving, something that she has found a bit more challenging since the arrival of their son Saxon last year. The couple also have a 40h lease block across the road, where they grow maize and raise the young stock. This block is a lot hillier but with amazing views that over look Matamata, and now has an extra special hill side spot where Aaron proposed to Krystal. For more of Krystal's amazing story, visit www.agwomenglobl.com/blog

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Discover alexandraleemold's Instagram View from the hot baths #outback #sunset #nsw #australia #trees #silhouette #baths 1630800999132061241_346408892

View from the hot baths #outback #sunset #nsw #australia #trees #silhouette #baths

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Discover mickmccabe's Instagram Grawan Creek where the Gwydir Highway crosses it a few kms out of Collarenebri #outback 1630800437472174892_193429200

Grawan Creek where the Gwydir Highway crosses it a few kms out of Collarenebri #outback

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Discover daviskimber's Instagram Fresh mango every day on the road. 
#outback #NSW #fruitflyexclusionzone 1630797281911887020_807534870

Fresh mango every day on the road. #outback #nsw #fruitflyexclusionzone

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Discover someguywny's Instagram Pretty sure the server has the hots for me #Outback #chicken #NoSteak 1630795468168864646_145212103

Pretty sure the server has the hots for me #Outback #chicken #nosteak

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Discover melbourne_photog72's Instagram Docklands. 1630794829612781595_4324712063

Docklands.

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