InswikiInswiki

Instagram Online Web Viewer

en

#nasabeyond • Discover images about nasabeyond in Instagram

Browse images about #nasabeyond. Explore recent medias tagged with nasabeyond from real instagram users and share them

Discover bartonvidrine's Instagram @nasa -  Jovian Art: Our Juno spacecraft skimmed the upper wisps of Jupiter's atmosphere when JunoCam snapped this image on Feb. 2, from an altitude of about 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers) above the giant planet's swirling cloudtops. Streams of clouds spin off a rotating oval-shaped cloud system in the Jovian southern hemisphere. Citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko reconstructed the color and cropped the image to draw viewers' eyes to the storm and the turbulence around it. 
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko

#nasa #jupiter #space #nasabeyond #astronomy #juno #planet #science - 1458439464417354630_240583860

@nasa - Jovian Art: Our Juno spacecraft skimmed the upper wisps of Jupiter's atmosphere when JunoCam snapped this image on Feb. 2, from an altitude of about 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers) above the giant planet's swirling cloudtops. Streams of clouds spin off a rotating oval-shaped cloud system in the Jovian southern hemisphere. Citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko reconstructed the color and cropped the image to draw viewers' eyes to the storm and the turbulence around it. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko #nasa #jupiter #space #nasabeyond #astronomy #juno #planet #science-

Share 0 3

Advertisement

Discover naturalsympathies's Instagram Somehow fleshy.
#Repost @nasa with @repostapp
・・・
Jovian Art: Our Juno spacecraft skimmed the upper wisps of Jupiter's atmosphere when JunoCam snapped this image on Feb. 2, from an altitude of about 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers) above the giant planet's swirling cloudtops. Streams of clouds spin off a rotating oval-shaped cloud system in the Jovian southern hemisphere. Citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko reconstructed the color and cropped the image to draw viewers' eyes to the storm and the turbulence around it. 
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko

#nasa #jupiter #space #nasabeyond #astronomy #juno #planet #science 1458426384933619709_3774598684

Somehow fleshy. #repost@nasa with @repostapp ・・・ Jovian Art: Our Juno spacecraft skimmed the upper wisps of Jupiter's atmosphere when JunoCam snapped this image on Feb. 2, from an altitude of about 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers) above the giant planet's swirling cloudtops. Streams of clouds spin off a rotating oval-shaped cloud system in the Jovian southern hemisphere. Citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko reconstructed the color and cropped the image to draw viewers' eyes to the storm and the turbulence around it. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko #nasa #jupiter #space #nasabeyond #astronomy #juno #planet #science

Share 0 6

Advertisement

Discover deanoceans's Instagram #repost from @nasa 
Jovian Art: Our Juno spacecraft skimmed the upper wisps of Jupiter's atmosphere when JunoCam snapped this image on Feb. 2, from an altitude of about 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers) above the giant planet's swirling cloudtops. Streams of clouds spin off a rotating oval-shaped cloud system in the Jovian southern hemisphere. Citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko reconstructed the color and cropped the image to draw viewers' eyes to the storm and the turbulence around it. 
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko

#nasa #jupiter #space #nasabeyond #astronomy #juno #planet #science 1458424158052808819_422071270

#repostfrom @nasa Jovian Art: Our Juno spacecraft skimmed the upper wisps of Jupiter's atmosphere when JunoCam snapped this image on Feb. 2, from an altitude of about 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers) above the giant planet's swirling cloudtops. Streams of clouds spin off a rotating oval-shaped cloud system in the Jovian southern hemisphere. Citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko reconstructed the color and cropped the image to draw viewers' eyes to the storm and the turbulence around it. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko #nasa #jupiter #space #nasabeyond #astronomy #juno #planet #science

Share 1 4

Advertisement

Discover pearcespace's Instagram The nautral world is so beautiful.

#Repost @nasa with @repostapp
・・・
Jovian Art: Our Juno spacecraft skimmed the upper wisps of Jupiter's atmosphere when JunoCam snapped this image on Feb. 2, from an altitude of about 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers) above the giant planet's swirling cloudtops. Streams of clouds spin off a rotating oval-shaped cloud system in the Jovian southern hemisphere. Citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko reconstructed the color and cropped the image to draw viewers' eyes to the storm and the turbulence around it. 
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko

#nasa #jupiter #space #nasabeyond #astronomy #juno #planet #science 1458417300884913001_3558895778

The nautral world is so beautiful. #repost@nasa with @repostapp ・・・ Jovian Art: Our Juno spacecraft skimmed the upper wisps of Jupiter's atmosphere when JunoCam snapped this image on Feb. 2, from an altitude of about 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers) above the giant planet's swirling cloudtops. Streams of clouds spin off a rotating oval-shaped cloud system in the Jovian southern hemisphere. Citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko reconstructed the color and cropped the image to draw viewers' eyes to the storm and the turbulence around it. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko #nasa #jupiter #space #nasabeyond #astronomy #juno #planet #science

Share 0 7
Discover maxholden1's Instagram #Repost @nasa with @repostapp
・・・
Jovian Art: Our Juno spacecraft skimmed the upper wisps of Jupiter's atmosphere when JunoCam snapped this image on Feb. 2, from an altitude of about 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers) above the giant planet's swirling cloudtops. Streams of clouds spin off a rotating oval-shaped cloud system in the Jovian southern hemisphere. Citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko reconstructed the color and cropped the image to draw viewers' eyes to the storm and the turbulence around it. 
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko

#nasa #jupiter #space #nasabeyond #astronomy #juno #planet #science 1458414307644694983_561112395

#repost@nasa with @repostapp ・・・ Jovian Art: Our Juno spacecraft skimmed the upper wisps of Jupiter's atmosphere when JunoCam snapped this image on Feb. 2, from an altitude of about 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers) above the giant planet's swirling cloudtops. Streams of clouds spin off a rotating oval-shaped cloud system in the Jovian southern hemisphere. Citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko reconstructed the color and cropped the image to draw viewers' eyes to the storm and the turbulence around it. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko #nasa #jupiter #space #nasabeyond #astronomy #juno #planet #science

Share 0 11
Discover thisbrent's Instagram #Repost @nasa with @repostapp
・・・
Jovian Art: Our Juno spacecraft skimmed the upper wisps of Jupiter's atmosphere when JunoCam snapped this image on Feb. 2, from an altitude of about 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers) above the giant planet's swirling cloudtops. Streams of clouds spin off a rotating oval-shaped cloud system in the Jovian southern hemisphere. Citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko reconstructed the color and cropped the image to draw viewers' eyes to the storm and the turbulence around it. 
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko

#nasa #jupiter #space #nasabeyond #astronomy #juno #planet #science 1458410749668325120_4020511561

#repost@nasa with @repostapp ・・・ Jovian Art: Our Juno spacecraft skimmed the upper wisps of Jupiter's atmosphere when JunoCam snapped this image on Feb. 2, from an altitude of about 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers) above the giant planet's swirling cloudtops. Streams of clouds spin off a rotating oval-shaped cloud system in the Jovian southern hemisphere. Citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko reconstructed the color and cropped the image to draw viewers' eyes to the storm and the turbulence around it. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko #nasa #jupiter #space #nasabeyond #astronomy #juno #planet #science

Share 3 5
Discover bruce_campbellrulz's Instagram Really cool looking!

#Repost @nasa with @repostapp
・・・
Jovian Art: Our Juno spacecraft skimmed the upper wisps of Jupiter's atmosphere when JunoCam snapped this image on Feb. 2, from an altitude of about 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers) above the giant planet's swirling cloudtops. Streams of clouds spin off a rotating oval-shaped cloud system in the Jovian southern hemisphere. Citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko reconstructed the color and cropped the image to draw viewers' eyes to the storm and the turbulence around it. 
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko

#nasa #jupiter #space #nasabeyond #astronomy #juno #planet #science 1458407218852668295_1819373208

Really cool looking! #repost@nasa with @repostapp ・・・ Jovian Art: Our Juno spacecraft skimmed the upper wisps of Jupiter's atmosphere when JunoCam snapped this image on Feb. 2, from an altitude of about 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers) above the giant planet's swirling cloudtops. Streams of clouds spin off a rotating oval-shaped cloud system in the Jovian southern hemisphere. Citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko reconstructed the color and cropped the image to draw viewers' eyes to the storm and the turbulence around it. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko #nasa #jupiter #space #nasabeyond #astronomy #juno #planet #science

Share 2 9
Discover nasa's Instagram Jovian Art: Our Juno spacecraft skimmed the upper wisps of Jupiter's atmosphere when JunoCam snapped this image on Feb. 2, from an altitude of about 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers) above the giant planet's swirling cloudtops. Streams of clouds spin off a rotating oval-shaped cloud system in the Jovian southern hemisphere. Citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko reconstructed the color and cropped the image to draw viewers' eyes to the storm and the turbulence around it. 
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko

#nasa #jupiter #space #nasabeyond #astronomy #juno #planet #science 1458402496652615427_528817151

Jovian Art: Our Juno spacecraft skimmed the upper wisps of Jupiter's atmosphere when JunoCam snapped this image on Feb. 2, from an altitude of about 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers) above the giant planet's swirling cloudtops. Streams of clouds spin off a rotating oval-shaped cloud system in the Jovian southern hemisphere. Citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko reconstructed the color and cropped the image to draw viewers' eyes to the storm and the turbulence around it. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko #nasa #jupiter #space #nasabeyond #astronomy #juno #planet #science

Share 377 102K
Discover goodtoknowcommunity's Instagram Bang! The events surrounding the Big Bang were so cataclysmic that they left an indelible imprint on the fabric of the cosmos. We can detect these scars today by observing the oldest light in the universe. As it was created nearly 14 billion years ago, this light - which exists now as weak microwave radiation and is thus named the cosmic microwave background (CMB) - permeates the entire cosmos, filling it with detectable photons.
The Hubble Space Telescope observed one of most massive known galaxy clusters, seen in this image. This observation of the cluster, 5 billion light-years from Earth, helped astronomers study the cosmic microwave background. 
Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, T. Kitayama (Toho University, Japan)/ESA/Hubble & NASA
#nasa #hst #hubble #nasabeyond #astronomy #galacy #bigbangtheory #bigbang #cosmos #universe #science #goodtoknow ✌💞 1458367067233554247_238695351

Bang! The events surrounding the Big Bang were so cataclysmic that they left an indelible imprint on the fabric of the cosmos. We can detect these scars today by observing the oldest light in the universe. As it was created nearly 14 billion years ago, this light - which exists now as weak microwave radiation and is thus named the cosmic microwave background (CMB) - permeates the entire cosmos, filling it with detectable photons. The Hubble Space Telescope observed one of most massive known galaxy clusters, seen in this image. This observation of the cluster, 5 billion light-years from Earth, helped astronomers study the cosmic microwave background. Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, T. Kitayama (Toho University, Japan)/ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #hst #hubble #nasabeyond #astronomy #galacy #bigbangtheory #bigbang #cosmos #universe #science #goodtoknow✌💞

Share 1 16
Discover stardust90_'s Instagram Just wow😮💫
.
.
.
@Regrann from @laws.of.the.universe -  These are the infos about the recently discovery of 7 planets in TRAPPIST-1 System . The orbital period amazed me . 🔭🌠 - #regrann #nasa #space #exoplanet #earthlike #habitablezone #star #trappist1 #astronomy #spitzer #science - #regrann #astronomy #forevercurious #stardust #space #cosmos #galaxy #explore #nasabeyond #nasasocial #shareyourpassion #sciencecommunication #iwanttoknow #instadaily #instagood 1458332903745526816_4469125882

Just wow😮💫 . . . @Regrann from @laws.of.the.universe - These are the infos about the recently discovery of 7 planets in TRAPPIST-1 System . The orbital period amazed me . 🔭🌠 - #regrann #nasa #space #exoplanet #earthlike #habitablezone #star #trappist1 #astronomy #spitzer #science- #regrann #astronomy #forevercurious #stardust #space #cosmos #galaxy #explore #nasabeyond #nasasocial #shareyourpassion #sciencecommunication #iwanttoknow #instadaily #instagood

Share 1 30
Discover struttura_originaria's Instagram #Repost @nasa with @repostapp
・・・
We found a signal at the center of the neighboring Andromeda galaxy that could indicate the presence of the mysterious stuff known as dark matter. The gamma-ray signal is similar to one seen by Fermi at the center of our own Milky Way galaxy. Gamma rays are the highest-energy form of light, produced by the universe's most energetic phenomena. They're common in galaxies like the Milky Way because cosmic rays, particles moving near the speed of light, produce gamma rays when they interact with interstellar gas clouds and starlight. The gamma-ray excess (shown in yellow-white) at the heart of M31 hints at unexpected goings-on in the galaxy's central region. Scientists think the signal could be produced by a variety of processes, including a population of pulsars or even dark matter.

Credits: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration and Bill Schoening, Vanessa Harvey/REU program/NOAO/AURA/NSF

#nasa #nasabeyond #space #astronomy #galaxy #darkmatter #milyway #science 1458323694421313175_945138183

#repost@nasa with @repostapp ・・・ We found a signal at the center of the neighboring Andromeda galaxy that could indicate the presence of the mysterious stuff known as dark matter. The gamma-ray signal is similar to one seen by Fermi at the center of our own Milky Way galaxy. Gamma rays are the highest-energy form of light, produced by the universe's most energetic phenomena. They're common in galaxies like the Milky Way because cosmic rays, particles moving near the speed of light, produce gamma rays when they interact with interstellar gas clouds and starlight. The gamma-ray excess (shown in yellow-white) at the heart of M31 hints at unexpected goings-on in the galaxy's central region. Scientists think the signal could be produced by a variety of processes, including a population of pulsars or even dark matter. Credits: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration and Bill Schoening, Vanessa Harvey/REU program/NOAO/AURA/NSF #nasa #nasabeyond #space #astronomy #galaxy #darkmatter #milyway #science

Share 1 12
Discover ash_krafton's Instagram regram @nasa
We found a signal at the center of the neighboring Andromeda galaxy that could indicate the presence of the mysterious stuff known as dark matter. The gamma-ray signal is similar to one seen by Fermi at the center of our own Milky Way galaxy. Gamma rays are the highest-energy form of light, produced by the universe's most energetic phenomena. They're common in galaxies like the Milky Way because cosmic rays, particles moving near the speed of light, produce gamma rays when they interact with interstellar gas clouds and starlight. The gamma-ray excess (shown in yellow-white) at the heart of M31 hints at unexpected goings-on in the galaxy's central region. Scientists think the signal could be produced by a variety of processes, including a population of pulsars or even dark matter.

Credits: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration and Bill Schoening, Vanessa Harvey/REU program/NOAO/AURA/NSF

#nasa #nasabeyond #space #astronomy #galaxy #darkmatter #milyway #science 1458248129404939503_377331922

regram @nasa We found a signal at the center of the neighboring Andromeda galaxy that could indicate the presence of the mysterious stuff known as dark matter. The gamma-ray signal is similar to one seen by Fermi at the center of our own Milky Way galaxy. Gamma rays are the highest-energy form of light, produced by the universe's most energetic phenomena. They're common in galaxies like the Milky Way because cosmic rays, particles moving near the speed of light, produce gamma rays when they interact with interstellar gas clouds and starlight. The gamma-ray excess (shown in yellow-white) at the heart of M31 hints at unexpected goings-on in the galaxy's central region. Scientists think the signal could be produced by a variety of processes, including a population of pulsars or even dark matter. Credits: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration and Bill Schoening, Vanessa Harvey/REU program/NOAO/AURA/NSF #nasa #nasabeyond #space #astronomy #galaxy #darkmatter #milyway #science

Share 1 11
Discover bloggeerroficial's Instagram @nasabrasil
・・・
Os eventos ocorridos durante o Big Bang foram tão cataclísmicos que deixaram uma marca eterna no tecido do cosmos. Atualmente podemos detectar essas cicatrizes através da observação da radiação mais antiga do Universo. Tendo sido criada há quase 14 bilhões de anos, esta radiação — que existe atualmente sob a forma de radiação fraca de microondas e toma o nome de radiação cósmica de fundo (CMB, sigla em inglês para cosmic microwave background) — expandiu-se permeando todo o cosmos e enchendo-o de fótons detectáveis.

A CMB pode ser usada para investigar o cosmos através de um fenômeno chamado efeito Sunyaev-Zel´dovich (SZ), o qual foi observado pela primeira vez há cerca de 30 anos. A CMB detecta-se na Terra, uma vez que os seus fótons, de comprimentos de onda na região das microondas, viajam até nós. Ao longo da sua viagem, os fótons passam através de aglomerados de galáxias que contêm elétrons de alta energia, os quais lhes dão um minúsculo “empurrão” energético. Detectar estes fótons que foram “empurrados” com os nossos telescópios é algo desafiante mas importante — já que estas partículas elementares podem ajudar os astrônomos a compreender algumas das propriedades fundamentais do Universo, tais como a localização e distribuição de aglomerados de galáxias densos.

Esta imagem mostra as primeiras medições do efeito térmico de Sunyaev-Zel´dovich obtidas com o Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), no Chile. Os astrônomos combinaram dados das antenas ALMA de 7 e 12 metros de diâmetro, produzindo a imagem mais nítida possível. O alvo foi um dos aglomerados de galáxias mais massivos conhecido, o RX J1347.5-1145, o qual se pode ver como um “buraco” escuro na imagem. As cores correspondem ao brilho — por outras palavras, ao número de fótons detectado no domínio de comprimentos de onda estudado. Regiões vermelhas, laranja e amarelas são especialmente brilhantes, as cores cyan e verde apresentam um brilho médio e o azul e violeta correspondem a brilho fraco. 
#nasa #hst #hubble #nasabeyond #astronomy #galacy #bigbangtheory #bigbang #cosmos #universe #scienc 1458240485386078100_2104531714

@nasabrasil ・・・ Os eventos ocorridos durante o Big Bang foram tão cataclísmicos que deixaram uma marca eterna no tecido do cosmos. Atualmente podemos detectar essas cicatrizes através da observação da radiação mais antiga do Universo. Tendo sido criada há quase 14 bilhões de anos, esta radiação — que existe atualmente sob a forma de radiação fraca de microondas e toma o nome de radiação cósmica de fundo (CMB, sigla em inglês para cosmic microwave background) — expandiu-se permeando todo o cosmos e enchendo-o de fótons detectáveis. A CMB pode ser usada para investigar o cosmos através de um fenômeno chamado efeito Sunyaev-Zel´dovich (SZ), o qual foi observado pela primeira vez há cerca de 30 anos. A CMB detecta-se na Terra, uma vez que os seus fótons, de comprimentos de onda na região das microondas, viajam até nós. Ao longo da sua viagem, os fótons passam através de aglomerados de galáxias que contêm elétrons de alta energia, os quais lhes dão um minúsculo “empurrão” energético. Detectar estes fótons que foram “empurrados” com os nossos telescópios é algo desafiante mas importante — já que estas partículas elementares podem ajudar os astrônomos a compreender algumas das propriedades fundamentais do Universo, tais como a localização e distribuição de aglomerados de galáxias densos. Esta imagem mostra as primeiras medições do efeito térmico de Sunyaev-Zel´dovich obtidas com o Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), no Chile. Os astrônomos combinaram dados das antenas ALMA de 7 e 12 metros de diâmetro, produzindo a imagem mais nítida possível. O alvo foi um dos aglomerados de galáxias mais massivos conhecido, o RX J1347.5-1145, o qual se pode ver como um “buraco” escuro na imagem. As cores correspondem ao brilho — por outras palavras, ao número de fótons detectado no domínio de comprimentos de onda estudado. Regiões vermelhas, laranja e amarelas são especialmente brilhantes, as cores cyan e verde apresentam um brilho médio e o azul e violeta correspondem a brilho fraco. #nasa #hst #hubble #nasabeyond #astronomy #galacy #bigbangtheory #bigbang #cosmos #universe #scienc

Share 1 10
Discover odetta_vintage's Instagram #hubble #nasabeyond  rg @nasa 1458228157286869139_1112443007

#hubble #nasabeyond rg @nasa

Share 0 6
Load More